In Between Days

Whilst I’ve been busy with the Jumbo, I had to pause whilst I was awaiting a new gearbox unit for it.
I decided to take advantage of this lull to tackle another wagon.
The Ratio LMS 12T van is an old but excellent kit that belies its near forty year age in terms of quality.
Being the sort of individual I am however, I couldn’t just build the kit as it came. I decided to produce a Diagram 1897 vacuum fitted van which meant using a different chassis, in this case a Parkside 10′ wheelbase chassis with J-hanger suspension.
In addition, the vehicle has 8-shoe clasp brakes and diagonal strengtheners on the body sides.
It was an easy enough job to substitute the new solebars due to the breakdown of chassis parts; they just butt on to the standard chassis. The diagonals were simply added using microstrip and probably need some rivet details added. I’ll likely use Archers transfers for those prior to applying the top coat of paint.
The buffers are as usual the excellent Lanarkshire Model Supplies items and the roof vents are from MJT.
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About maxstafford60093

Scotsman in exile. Lover of Scotland's railways, land, people and culture. Always got an ear for new and interesting music. Politically of the left and most definitely repelled by the shallow and narcissistic. An unlikely jazz-cat mod rocker with punk tendencies; a bit 1968, a bit 1977 with a distracting overdub of 1958... Most often found outdoors with my four legged buddy!
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4 Responses to In Between Days

  1. Jamie Wood says:

    Excellent. This is what I’ve had planned for my long-awaited sample of these kits. Good to hear the sole bar swap is straightforward, but I’d guessed the worst case would just be to swap out the whole floor.

    • There really wasn’t much to it Jamie. The replacements just fitted against the existing central section. You probably could add a new floor but I found it just as easy to use the existing arrangement. It leaves a small gap between the solebar and the body sides but it’s out of sight and easily cured with some plastic strip.
      It adds a nice bit of variety to the van fleet and in any case, vacuum fitted vehicles are more fitting for the second half of the 1950s.
      If you’ll pardon the pun…

  2. Tim says:

    What coupling system do you intend to use?

    • Hi Tim.

      I have a trial pack of Spratt and Winkles here. I suspect these will function much as Kadees do but with a more discrete appearance.
      We’ll see how things go with these before making a major decision. It may be that they suit a particular niche rather than universal service.

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In Between Days

Whilst I’ve been busy with the Jumbo, I had to pause whilst I was awaiting a new gearbox unit for it.
I decided to take advantage of this lull to tackle another wagon.
The Ratio LMS 12T van is an old but excellent kit that belies its near forty year age in terms of quality.
Being the sort of individual I am however, I couldn’t just build the kit as it came. I decided to produce a Diagram 1897 vacuum fitted van which meant using a different chassis, in this case a Parkside 10′ wheelbase chassis with J-hanger suspension.
In addition, the vehicle has 8-shoe clasp brakes and diagonal strengtheners on the body sides.
It was an easy enough job to substitute the new solebars due to the breakdown of chassis parts; they just butt on to the standard chassis. The diagonals were simply added using microstrip and probably need some rivet details added. I’ll likely use Archers transfers for those prior to applying the top coat of paint.
The buffers are as usual the excellent Lanarkshire Model Supplies items and the roof vents are from MJT.
20130525-074657.jpg

20130525-074715.jpg

20130525-074726.jpg

About maxstafford60093

Scotsman in exile. Lover of Scotland's railways, land, people and culture. Always got an ear for new and interesting music. Politically of the left and most definitely repelled by the shallow and narcissistic. An unlikely jazz-cat mod rocker with punk tendencies; a bit 1968, a bit 1977 with a distracting overdub of 1958... Most often found outdoors with my four legged buddy!
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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