Summer evening’s walk

Seeing as it was such a good evening, I decided to give Abi an extra walk and spontaneously picked the path from Lyneside Station to Fauldmoor Crossing. This was the true racing ground of the Waverley Route as it got into its stride out of Carlisle, past Harker and trains could attain high speeds before slowing for Longtown.

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Lyneside Station was the turnback and daytime stabling point for the Parkside/Harker workers trains and is today a very attractive private dwelling. The lower floor of the signal box still exists and in fact the upper level survived into the 1990s before succumbing to time and the elements.
On a beautiful evening such as the one just past it was wonderful to imagine being here fifty or sixty years ago watching trains pass.
Although the top of the formation has been heavily skimmed in places, there are many relics still in existence such as ballast boxes and signal runners and even what looks like a gradient post!

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Just north of the station the route crosses the river Lyne and though the viaduct decking was dismantled after this section closed in September 1970, the path conversion has resulted in a wooden footbridge being constructed and supported on the old buttresses and piers. These piers have certainly been subject to renovation and repair during their railway service and this work is much in evidence from blue brickwork among the original stone to the heavy rail bracing round the central pier. You can still see the channel and steel pad where the original plate sides rested. Also in evidence was a massive accumulation of driftwood that must have piled up during the extreme rain we experienced here on the 18th of May. Further north is a cattle creep which Abi inspected on the way back.

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After an hour we were back at Lyneside after our walk lineside!
By now the sun was about setting but the light was making both the red sandstone of the station and the red bark of the attendant Scots Pines glow with a warm richness that is one of the attributes that makes Pinus Sylvestris my favourite tree!

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An evening well spent and it was easy to imagine an A2 or similar racing north on a rake of coaches, the whole ensemble glowing in the low sun!

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About maxstafford60093

Scotsman in exile. Lover of Scotland's railways, land, people and culture. Always got an ear for new and interesting music. Politically of the left and most definitely repelled by the shallow and narcissistic. An unlikely jazz-cat mod rocker with punk tendencies; a bit 1968, a bit 1977 with a distracting overdub of 1958... Most often found outdoors with my four legged buddy!
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